Apr
14

OK Computer

OK Computer

10 Albums that changed my life

OK Computer by Radiohead

My third choice. The Beatles after Rubber Soul and Revolver went to the White Album. It was a seismic jump.

I loved The Bends. How could I not with its beautiful tunes. The world loved it too and waited with heady anticipation for what the band would do next. What they did was blow our minds with OK Computer. Musically it’s not the same as The White Album, but it’s reach into our psyche is. It probably affected me with its powerful waves more than any other record I have ever heard.

It is also an album that deserves to be heard in full. It’s a journey like no other. By the end of it and it’s delicious full stop, you are left just wondering how on Earth this was ever written. It’s simply too good.

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Apr
14

Definitely Maybe

Definitely Maybe

10 Albums that changed my life

Definitely Maybe by Oasis

My fourth choice. In 1994 we were hit by the hurricane that was Definitely Maybe. All these years on its hard to convey just how important this album was to so many people, not least of which because the Gallagher boys turned the band into a circus. Back then though when they and we thought they might just live forever, we all dared to sing their snarling anthems to the tops of our voices in every club and pub we could.

It was also the album that inspired Steve, Nigel and I to invest our lives into our band, Wide Eyed Wonder, and I base my third book (Being in a Band & out later this year) around this relationship we had with this album.

Definitely Maybe is a record that snarls. It’s a dirty, brash album that stuck two fingers up at the world within which the Gallaghers has grown up and we, the people, took on its energy to add our own two fingered salute.

Within 2 years Oasis proved themselves to be the UK’s biggest band ever at Knebworth.

The truth is however nothing would ever match the magic of their finest album, Definitely Maybe.

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Apr
14

Cafe Del Mar – Volume VI

Cafe Del Mar - Volume VI

10 Albums that changed my life

Cafe Del Mar Volume VI by José Padilla

My fifth choice. It’s the late 90’s and I’ve been holding down a senior management role in a bank and running around the country in Wide Eyed Wonder for far too long plus looking after all my life connections. It’s a little hectic to say the least.

At some point I stumbled into the luxurious world of Cafe Del Mar and found a gear shift. It was the best of tonics and quite literally changed my life. It was Music I could not write personally or indeed had access to. A beautiful healing balm was there in record form for me to just switch into and switch off.

Since then I’ve listened to most of the Cafe Del Mar series often and found other series such as the excellent Puro, but this album will always be the one that opened it all up for me.

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Apr
14

Kind of Blue

Kind of Blue

10 Albums that changed my life

Kind of Blue by Miles Davis

My sixth choice. I’m not sure when I woke up to jazz. Maybe it was the Fast Show that prompted me to be curious? Maybe the TV series ‘Midnight Caller’ with its lazy trumpet jazz playing late into the night? Certainly when I was younger it’s hard to remember the lack of radio stations to ever find genres you could listen to. Thankfully we had great record shops that you could lose yourself in for hours and occasionally you would find gold.

I fell into this stunning record after hearing a track played late one night on radio. It’s perfect jazz. There’s only 5 pieces and it lasts just 45 minutes and it’s awesome.

I like the fact that jazz splits opinion. It gives it an edge. This record, recorded in 1959, is vanguard stuff. It summed up what had come and set the bar for what would follow. Hearing tunes like this in some of the great jazz venues such as Ronnie Scott’s is pretty perfect.

The tracks here are different too but all accessible. Listen late with your back door open and a glass of wine to hand.

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Apr
14

Music for Airports

Music for Airports

10 Albums that changed my life

Music for Airports by Brian Eno

My seventh choice. A whole new genre wraps its arms around you & takes you to another world in this ambient feat of brilliance. Released in 1978 by Polydor records it sounds as relevant today and probably more so than it did then.

I first heard it mid 80’s and just couldn’t believe the joy i was able to connect to by letting it wash over me. If you’ve not heard it you may well wonder what it is like particularly given that I knew him as the producer of a U2 record! It is nothing like U2! Brian explained of this record and it’s genre:

“Ambient music must be able to accommodate many levels of listening attention without enforcing one in particular; it must be as ignorable as it is interesting.”

I would describe as listening to nature.

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